Category: Illustration

That Last Cover

A shorter interval than usual between McEdifice chapters. The delays are not in the speed of Timothy’s writing – he writes like the wind, as is only proper. Quantity is the mark of the true author and Tim has no time for those lazy liberal writers who are all “boo hoo, the collapse of civil society is getting in the way of my typing”.

Of course, I have to make his blimmin’ chapter covers (who has covers for chapters for grudness sake) and I am distracted by the collapse of civil society. Still I was inspired yesterday by my perennial guru for all things SF book covery: Brad Torgersen.

Brad was extolling the wonders of this cover for a forthcoming book by Mike Kupari.

I’ve already discussed Brad’s paradox before and he still seems to want books he doesn’t like to both HAVE and NOT HAVE overtly SF covers. The cover to All the Birds in the Sky makes him grumpy because its has no spaceships and yet he complains about books that do have spaceships on the cover being too literary. You just can’t win.

Or can you?

See, the way I see it is, if three, maybe four, rocket nozzles are good then NINE smokin’ rocket nozzles is EVEN BETTER!

Hence this:

mcedificeNOZZLES

Advertisements

Interactive Map!

Sadly, I can’t make an interactive map on the blog because of the way WordPress works. However, over in my more tinkering friendly workshop… https://camestrosfelapton.neocities.org/middleearthschematicsvg.html

That was a fun exercise – basically, it uses Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) and Javascript. The SVG is exported from the graphic program I made the original map in but I can access each layer programmatically. Learning is fun! Nerdy learning is funner! Nerdy learning with graphics is funnest!

Speaking of fun – Paul Weimer has written a defence of fantasy maps (or at least a defence of the good ones) http://skyseastone.net/jvstin/?p=4700

Revisiting the Map of Middle Earth

So I’m back on a map kick it seems.

I thought I’d look at the most classic of fantasy maps again but from a different perspective. Part of the problem and the attraction of Tolkien’s original map is the additional detail and a sense of a bigger explorable world. What happens if we strip that away and while we are at it making the right-angle problem a bit worse?

middleearthschematic01

Continue reading