Map of the Dragon Award Lands

Kerfuffles take careful planning and years of preparation. The Dragon Awards simply don’t get to ‘kerfuffle’ level overnight. Even so, with an additional faction and as I have a map thing going on recently, here is the Dragon Award Map. I’ve tried to make it as 1990’s extruded fantasy aesthetic as possible with big colours.

dragonmapcomplete

There have been many shifts of lands since the Puppy Kerfuffle Map. Rabidonia is still there but now has the Pulp Peninsular marked on with a misspelling caused by me trying not make a penis joke (since corrected). John C Wright now has his own separate island as does Larry Correia. Sadland has sailed off the map. Eric Flint’s island remains where it was but with a new name. Likewise, the island marked as ‘Whatever’ on the former map is in a similar position but now renamed. The mysterious lands of Inkshares have appeared out of the mists, as have (since yesterday) the newly discovered Red Panda Land. The Islets of Confused Nominees are famed for being inhabited by authors saying “I’ve been nominated for a what now?”

Advertisements

41 comments

  1. Lurkertype

    This is nothing short of brilliant in design, aesthetic, and naming. And Papyrus!

    The mysterious land of Inkshares is so mysterious I don’t recall hearing of it.

    Do you perhaps mean “The Pulp Peninsula”? (noun, not adjective)

    I wish there was some way to depict the flotilla as much larger. Maybe put a generic extruded fantasy sailing ship there? A ship would fit the aesthetic of these maps.

    And of course the whole map is Here There Be Dragons.
    (another reason to have a ship)

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Pingback: Pixel Scroll 9/1/17 You Only Scroll Twice | File 770
  3. Jon Del Arroz

    Not sure, but whatever it is, lots of people checked out my book and learned i write fun, good fiction and they don’t have to deal with politics in it! 🙂 So I’m quite happy with how it’s all gone.

    Like

  4. greghullender

    If you define “politics” so broadly that you can seriously claim that “there’s politics in all stories,” then I claim you don’t have a very useful definition.

    Just speaking about short fiction, I find that very few stories–maybe 5% or less-have anything I’d call a political message. Of those that do, it’s invariably a detriment. Not always a fatal detriment–all stories have flaws of one kind or another–but it’s not a plus. Even when the political message is one that you agree with.

    Like

    • camestrosfelapton

      1. “politics” and “political message” are two different thing
      2. A relatively tight definition of politics may still imply that most stories contain political elements. Note the issue isn’t whether its a definition of politics that includes everything but vice-versa a definition that means politics can be found in anything.
      3. Star Realms: Rescue Run contains politics in most senses of ‘politics’ and arguably contains a political message

      Liked by 1 person

      • JJ

        camestrosfelapton:
        1. “politics” and “political message” are two different thing
        2. A relatively tight definition of politics may still imply that most stories contain political elements. Note the issue isn’t whether its a definition of politics that includes everything but vice-versa a definition that means politics can be found in anything.

        Exactly. Where people tend to find “political messages”, I think, is when the plot is based on a setup they disagree with.

        For example, a book with a highly authoritarian government, where this is portrayed as a functional, successful culture, is going to be perceived as a “political message” by someone whose personal bent is anti-authoritarian. Likewise, a book where the main figures in power are women, and this is portrayed as a functional, successful culture, is going to be perceived as a “political message” by someone who doesn’t feel that women are capable of those sorts of roles.

        Conversely, a book with a highly authoritarian government, where this is portrayed as a dysfunctional, oppressive culture, is going to be perceived as a “political message” by someone whose personal bent is authoritarian. Likewise, a book where the main figures in power are women, and this is portrayed as a dysfunctional, oppressive culture, is going to be perceived as a “political message” by someone who feels that women are capable of those sorts of roles.

        When people believe that there is nothing political in a book, it’s almost always a case of a fish not noticing the water in which it is accustomed to swimming.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Feh

        It’s mean to accuse Del Arroz of writing about politics; he’s just writing a story with politicians and political conflict – no politics there. Next thing you know, you’ll be accusing him of writing prose!

        Like

      • Mark

        “I’m not writing sentences, I’m just writing words in a sensible order with a full-stop at the end.”

        Now now, let’s not get too optimistic.

        Like

    • Matt Y

      Difference between politics and politics message. Like Infomocracy had a lot of politics but the underlying theme of the story I didn’t see as having a strong political message. Broken Earth had politics and slavery however I didn’t read a political message in them aside from the recurring systems of abuse in order to make life more comfortable for some, though there are those who would see a political message in that.

      The Expanse features a gay married couple with a child, and despite that not being thematucally what the book is about will see that as a political message regardless.

      While I agree with you that most books aren’t thematically political with the story intended to convey a positive or negative political message, the content can be seen as political. Like how Star Wars isn’t political message fiction about rebelling against unchecked fascism, and yet it contains characters rebelling against an Empire.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s