It’s the Final Meltdown

Well the Pups certainly strung that electoral defeat out for as long as possible. Vox Day is beginning to adjust but is also now suggesting that the big-secret-q-plan might come into fruition 10 days from now:

“it is going to be extremely amusing if “10 days of darkness” turns out to be a reference to how long Biden is permitted to pretend he is President.”

http://voxday.blogspot.com/2021/01/failure-has-consequences.html

Spoiler: there never was a big-secret-q-plan.

86 thoughts on “It’s the Final Meltdown

  1. Seen the “Maybe the real Q was the friends we made along the way” post from the person who was probably behind QAnon?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Some other grifter will probably try to take over Q. Ron Watkins is not the first, but administering the server where Q posted essentially gives him control. Earlier versions of Q managed to move the grift successfully from 4chan so it can probably be done again.

      The more interesting question is how well it will survive Biden’s inauguration. I personally think the best strategy would be to introduce a new character (S, since apparently there’s an R somewhere) and blame the election on Q and Trump.

      As far as Vox Day is concerned, he strikes me as the conspiracy theorist equivalent to the drug dealer who gets high on his own supply.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. There’s so much giant projection among the RW that they oughta be called IMAX.

        Their whole thing is that Tr*mp was going to take down rich pedophiles. Yet Tr*mp was a buddy of Jeffrey Epstein for years. There’s a picture of Agent Orange firmly holding a tween Ivanka, and the look she’s giving Epstein is absolutely haunting/haunted.

        Meanwhile, at the same time, Biden was doing yeoman’s work in the Senate and raising a nice blended family with Dr. Jill.

        Liked by 4 people

    2. The funny thing is, “Q” hasn’t posted anything in six weeks, and none of them seem to have wondered if maybe he died. “God always wins” but an awful lot of His servants had some bad endings along the way.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. I belatedly realized today that the reason why so many Americans have fallen with this Q-Crap is that a large percentage of them are Evangelical Christians who are constantly prophecizing the END OF THE WORLD at a specific date. My favorite, which I fell victim to as a kid (not raised as an evangelical), was that all the planets were about line up and the gravitational pull would bring on the Apocalypse. When the date came and went, I asked my childhood friend who had invited me to his church where I heard this prophecy and was freaked out (I was very young), and he just looked annoyed and just shrugged.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. As I’ve noted in the past, it’s hard not to think the appeal for Beale–and many older QAnoners, for that matter–is a return to the sort of Born Again AM radio ‘Gematria for Dummies” they grew up in, which played elaborate games with reality and saw codes where none existed, all so that the faithful could no that there salvation from the Godless Hordes approached.

      Liked by 3 people

    2. I’ve never understood how supposed “Biblical literalists” keep predicting the Apocalypse when Jesus says right in the Bible that “no one will know the day or the hour”.

      I mean… wouldn’t Jesus be the infallible expert on that?

      Liked by 3 people

      1. My Southern Baptist friends said “no one will know the day or the hour–but he didn’t mention the week!” They were only slightly joking.

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      2. Your scare-quotes indicate you know the secret. There are no “Biblical literalists.” All of us who are Christians take some parts as metaphorical and others as literal; we just disagree on which parts are which. The people who insist on taking Genesis 1 as a historical account don’t for a moment expect the beast rising out of the sea to be a real monster with seven tangible heads and ten actual horns. They’ll also duck out of the obligations entailed by Matthew 25 by saying it applies to a future “dispensation” — of such Jesus said fuck-all.

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      3. Jim Henley: Your scare-quotes indicate you know the secret. There are no “Biblical literalists.” All of us who are Christians take some parts as metaphorical and others as literal; we just disagree on which parts are which.

        Oh, yes there are Biblical literalists. I know a couplle of them, and they actually do do believe that all parts of the Bible were directly dictated by God to the people who wrote them down, and that everything that happens in them actually happened exactly as it’s described in the Bible. And the other members in the religious organizations to which they belong also believe this.

        You clearly haven’t experienced the full extent of the wingnuttery that exists in some corners of Christiandom.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. JJ, ask them who the Beast is as described in Revelation. (Either one!) I am pretty sure they will describe, if not name, a person or institution, not a literal monster that is really hard to draw. Ask if “THE Anti-Christ” (note: not a thing, Biblically) will disguise himself as a great peacemaker. Ask them if James is correct that salvation depends on faith AND works. (Encourage them to reference Matthew 16:27 in their answer: https://www.kingjamesbibleonline.org/Matthew-16-27/) Ask them how it is the tax collector in Luke 18 can be justified when does not come to God through faith in Christ.

        I’m out of practice, or I could come up with more. The point is, I’ll happily bet the answers to these questions have very little to do with the literal meaning of these passages.

        Liked by 1 person

      5. Jim Henley: ask them…

        Yeah, no, I’m not asking them anything. On the occasions when I discovered that each of these people was a literalist, I tried rationality: “But what about… “, “but if that were the case… “, etc., and got back responses on the same level of rationality as Qanon justifications, so I quickly just backed away. There’s no getting through to people who believe what they believe without any rational basis, and life’s too short for me to waste my time trying to change their minds or arguing with them.

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      6. Hi, JJ. To be clear, I didn’t mean argue with them. I meant, literally, ask them and pay attention to their answers. You said I’m ignorant of what these people are really like. I say THEY are ignorant about their self-conception* as “literalists.” The answers to these questions (among others) would speak to where the ignorance lies. I wouldn’t ask you to try to convert them out of fundagelicalism; I’m not a monster 😂.

        *A bonus assertion: these folks don’t really believe in “sola scriptura” either. They belong to well-defined interpretive communities ringing changes on Luther, Calvin and Darby.

        Liked by 1 person

      7. Jim Henley: I didn’t mean argue with them. I meant, literally, ask them and pay attention to their answers. You said I’m ignorant of what these people are really like.

        No, I said that they actually do exist. I tried offering some very basic examples — of the sort that any rational person would agree would not be real-life events, and they insisted they were.

        This was years ago. I gave up trying to reason with people who clearly have no ability, nor any desire, to reason. Life’s too short.

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      8. My preferred rebuttals for people who claim to be literalists — in the sense of insisting that the Bible is word-for-word the perfect and exact Word of God — are much less philosophically deep or analytical than yours, Jim, yet I think they are very effective.

        First, I simply remind them that there are multiple translations of the Bible. These multiple translations each interpret the Bible slightly differently. They can’t all be perfect representations of the word of God, since they each say slightly different things. So how do we know which one is actually the literal truth?

        Second, similarly to the first — I remind them that the Gospels differ from each other in multiple specifics about the details of Jesus’s life and teachings. And if they differ from each other, they can’t all literally be true word for word. How do we know which apostle was telling us the literal truth, and which was wrong or even lying?

        Liked by 1 person

      9. I was brought up within Catholicism, so it was always accepted that parts of the bible where literal and parts figurative and parts best ignored and left to the protestants. However, even then it was clear that the issue of picking between the figurative and literal parts wasn’t a simple matter.

        It’s interesting because as a cognitive problem parables have an awful lot in common with mathematical word problems https://www.amazon.com/Man-Left-Albuquerque-Heading-East/dp/0820458236

        Liked by 2 people

      10. “I am pretty sure they will describe, if not name, a person or institution, not a literal monster that is really hard to draw.”
        There’s a great bit in Farmer’s short story “Towards the Beloved City” where someone in the end times reports “Jesus has thrown the Beast into the lake of fire!” “But the Beast is the world government — you can’t throw a system of government into hellfire, can you?”

        Liked by 2 people

      11. Nice. Also, clearly the story came out before the Nobilis RPG got people used to things like throwing a system of government into hellfire.

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      12. @JJ, Jim Henley:
        More to the point, there are people who believe and insist they are Biblical literalists. But for the most part they only take literally the parts of the Bible they have actually read or focused on, which isn’t all of it. See also, ‘proof-texting’.

        Fred Clark over at Slacktivist has little good to say about those sorts, pointing out that the truly dangerous thing about them is that they firmly proclaim to be taking the Bible literally, that they aren’t following a hermeneutic for interpreting it… which, of course, completely blinds them to the fact that they are using a hermeneutic to interpret it, and just makes it more impossible for them to admit they may be wrong about anything.

        Liked by 2 people

    3. There were supposed to be a “many planets line up” sometime in my youth, and someone on telly promised taht it would help negate SOME of Earth’s gravity, and I spent the supposed day of line-up jumping about, trying to determine if I spent longer time in the air than normal.

      Not quite an apocalypse belief, I grant you. But, it still occasionally makes me chuckle.

      Liked by 4 people

    4. Evangelical Christians also get indoctrinated (from infancy, many of them) in believing impossible things. “You can’t pick it apart,” one of them told me, when I was asking about some End of Days prediction made by his church. “You just have to take it on faith!”

      No big surprise this translates to the rest of their lives as well.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. I moved to West Texas at age 16 and had to have people explain what all the “I Brake for Rapture” bumper stickers were all about.

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      2. @Astra: That (like so much else) doesn’t make sense. If they got Raptured, they wouldn’t be in the car any more to brake, so their car would just go along running over sinners till it ran out of gas.

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      3. The cars I’ve known tend to decelerate when left to themselves, though they’d likely do some damage first. Or maybe they use the Cruise Control all the time.

        When we lived in a then-godforsaken town in SE Georgia, I found a Rapture postcard at one of the two (yes, two) Christian book stores, showing planes crashing into buildings and empty cars inevitably doing the most harm imaginable as selected grave inhabitants float up to beckoning Jesus. I bought a dozen and mailed them to friends with captions like “Look! We’re getting our Just Deserts for laughing at them!” Luckily, I saved one and scanned it. The painting technique is just good enough to seem like a photo for the first half second.

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      4. Let’s see if this link works. (blows on microphone) Here’s Charles Anderson’s painting of The Rapture, image found online, but when I find the actual postcard I will scan it better.

        Rapture Postcard placeholder

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    1. A friend of mine who calls Teddy “Vex Duh” messaged me the other day about reading his blog for laughs. I’ll have to message back to see what today’s mirth was.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I try never to go into VD’s blog — it leaves me feeling dirty — but this one was hysterical. They were counting down the minutes in real time to Biden’s inauguration and the fantasized reemergence of trump and arrests of all their bugbears, Hillary, Biden, Obama, Kamala Harris. And it didn’t happen, and didn’t happen, and didn’t happen…

        Anyone who wants to study what happens to a cult when the prophecy goes bad should read this thread. Some gave up — “There was no plan!” (You’re only figuring this out now?). One sad dude said some women were laughing at him and he wanted to die. Some faulted trump and said that he chickened out. Then the appeals to God started — “We have to place our trust in God, and believe he will help us.” Then, like the Jehovah’s Witnesses, they doubled down. The assault will take place in two days, said VD. We fight in the shade, said a lot of people. (I never heard this phrase before, and it sounded kind of lazy to me — “We fight in the shade because it’s too hot in the sun.” I mean, shouldn’t it be “We fight in the shadows”?)

        Another funny part was when VD listed all the Executive Orders Biden was about to sign and said something like “And they think we’re going to take this lying down!” Sure, because clean air and water and getting rid of Covid are such horrors to the psyche, practically Lovecraftian.

        Liked by 4 people

      2. “We will fight in the shade” is from Herodotus’ account of Thermopylae, though for the Dark Lord Gossage-Vardebedian Spode it is from the bastardized film adaptation of ‘300’, the only version he and his ilk know. It was reportedly said by the Spartans in reply to the Persian army declaring that their arrows would blot out the sun. Now, the actual meaning of this would be ‘We will calmly fight on despite the overwhelming odds against us’, but Beale has no actual meaning–it is typical fascist fist-waving, devoid of any purpose beside referring to a past they imagine themselves to be the rightful inheritors of.

        As for Beale’s opposition to Biden’s executive orders, to a fascist everything not done by a fascist is evil and vile. It is a whiny manbaby ideology rooted in the belief of its own superiority that a century of failure hasn’t dislodged from its black, withered heart.

        Liked by 3 people

      3. Didn’t all the Spartans die at Thermopylae? (2500 year old spoiler: yes they did).

        The boys who quote that movie always seem to ignore that part.

        (Also the remarkable amount of homoeroticism in both the movie and ancient Greece)

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Around twenty-five years ago, Menachem Schneerson died. Lubavitch hasidim still believe he will return to become the Jewish messiah. In their neighborhoods, you see banners with his picture saying “Live, King Messiah!” Which is to say, true believers can talk themselves into anything, regardless of what the real world throws at them.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. The Jehovah’s Witnesses still go around knocking on doors even though they originally prophesied the world would end in 1878. No, 1881. No, 1914. No, 1918. No, 1925. No, 1975. (I remember that one — and even the one JW family I knew at the time didn’t believe it)

      At least the Lubavichers have never woken me up on a weekend.

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      1. Hm, on the other hand I have meet a few Jehovah’s Withnesses, I remember nothink bad about them. Okay I also getting woken up on a weekend, but at the moment I am more angry at fake Microsoft about that.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. My experience of the JWs is that if you actually argue the theology of their doctrine, they say they’ll call again with more information, but in practice they never come back.

        If you do know a bit about eschatology, this is a helpful tip.

        Liked by 2 people

  4. Whenever someone predicts a date for The Rapture, there’s usually a recalculation after that first date passes. They didn’t take into consideration some missed detail in the Bible and now have a new date! The trick is to keep it close enough to maintain the madness of the crowd while far enough away so it doesn’t pass too quickly.

    So how do they repackage the Q stuff so people stick with it? I mean they have to promise Biden and his allies will get theirs at some point, but there’s the delicate balance between keeping the promised storm close enough, but not too close.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I was just thinking exactly your first two sentences. That’s how it went down with the radio station doomsayer who told his followers to sell everything before the Rapture a few years ago.

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    2. One repackaging is to conclude that Biden is on the side of Q. I’ve read that it’s already been observed in the wild.

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      1. The advantage of creating a cult centered around secret messages being findable in the mundane, is you can then make any mundane thing into a secret message. Jill Biden wore a teal coat, and the hex-code for teal is #339999, and that adds to 42, and Clinton, the 42nd President, was there, so that means… and so on.

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  5. They were already splitting into factions and having alternate dates before the inauguration. Predictions are Sunday, end of January, March 12th Trump will return, etc. Some QAnon are dumping Trump from the prophecy and/or saying he’s actually part of the Deep State. QAnon swallowed every old conspiracy it can find and turned it into a mysteries cult, so parts of it will definitely keep going. And “influencers” can either milk it for money or for influence in right-wing sectors, both in the U.S. and now elsewhere. (Beale seems to be going for the latter.) It very well may turn into a religion:
    https://www.dailykos.com/stories/2021/1/18/2009147/-To-understand-what-happens-next-with-QAnon-it-helps-to-look-back-at-past-cults

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Is this gonna end with either Flavor-Aid or black Nikes?

      Or will it rumble along like other RW culture wars to keep grifters from having to get a real job?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. The latter, I think. It’s all based around vengeance against their perceived enemies to whom they add whenever anybody finally denies main prophecies. And that love of vengeance is about keeping bigot hierarchies and turning them into autocracies. They don’t need Trump anymore and they don’t need “Q” anymore. They just keep the Deep State idea that has been around decades and the pedophile trafficking rings maybe and just keep playing the game of secret messages. The mysteries cult of QAnon was dying down in 2019 because the prophecies of “Q” kept not coming to pass and then whoever was running “Q” at the time would go silent for awhile but other grifters for it would keep going. But they were losing steam until the pandemic. That produced a radical situation which juiced up the game.

        A lot of people scared about the pandemic or what would happen to society from it and not trusting all the doubletalk coming from Trump’s administration glommed on to QAnon, which meant they glommed on to Trump. They also glommed on to the no-mask idea, etc., on the grounds that if we, the rest of the country, were all doing it and said that it would help, clearly it did not and was Deep State dictated. Belief in the secret war against the Deep State conspiracy — recycling mainly 1990’s conspiracy theories — is the main driver, though, more than the kids stuff and Trump himself. The family that runs 8kun took advantage of it to keep up traffic and then some of the Republican politicians decided to go with it to help advance their careers, since Republicans have been using the “Deep State” for a long time. Most of the QAnon stuff actually fits in with Republican goals and propaganda as well as the alt right’s anti-Semitism, the MAGA’s white supremacy and trashing the media, the white evangelical theocracy campaign, sovereign citizen, etc. So it doesn’t have to stay any one set thing. The important thing is that there is a massive evil conspiracy trying to control things against the good and the just, but they will eventually be tricked and thwarted.

        Basically, it’s a fable. And they dress it up with whatever is lying around to feel powerful and justified.

        Liked by 1 person

    2. The March bunch are inheriting a strand of Sovereign Citizenship which believes that every election since 1872 has been a fraud. Thus, Trump is going to have a TRUE INAUGURATION, and be the grand restoration of the TRUE USA, and all the believers can be citizens of this for the low, low price…

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      1. Well reminds me of our rightwing-bunch, for them we didn’t exist since the second world war, or in the 2+4 treatys the BRD was acidently made nonexistand, and because it doesn’t exist they are now the leader because they dickear themselves to be. Reichsbürger are one of their names and interesting enough some of them were pretty armed.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I only just learned about Reichsburgers this past weekend, and yeah, they sound very similar to US Sovereign Citizens. (And, IIRC, British Freemen on the Land,)

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      3. The best thing about this is that in the famous picture, the flag Trump insincerely hugs has a huge gold fringe around it.

        Liked by 3 people

      4. Some of the Reichsbürger even believe that no German state past WWI truly ever existed. And the current Federal Republic of Germany is not a state but a corporation with Angela Merkel as the CEO.

        Another thing is that Reichsbürger are not happy with their regular ID’s and birth certificates (well, those were issued by a state they don’t recognise), but think they need a special certificate of origin (which is only needed in some cases such as adoption and children of international marriages). The state they don’t believe in is very happy to issue them this certificate – for a fee.

        They’re crazies, but sadly some of them have gun permits and one of them shot a police officer a few years ago.

        Liked by 2 people

    3. Right. The risk now is huge numbers of reeling Q-tips are hanging out on Telegram where violent white-supremacist groups are actively scheming to recruit them.

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  6. The take that Qism exploits a failure mode of white evangelicalism makes a lot of sense to me. As a progressive Episcopalian, I already consider white evangelicalism to be a failure mode of Christianity. What puzzles me is the way right-wing Orthodox Jews and trad-minded Catholics have converged on so many of the same fantasias despite being grounded in distinctly different beliefs and practices,

    I’m not trying to let White Christianity off the hook here. We’ve got a lot to answer for! It’s precisely because I learned from contemporary critiques by Jewish writers of the nonsensical notion of “the Judeo-Christian tradition” that I’m surprised it lead to very different reactionary forms. Similarly, tradcaths come out of a tradition that rejects sola scripture, Total Depravity and Election and embraces a very different view of “faith vs. works.” And yet, here they all are: three peas in a paranoid pod.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Here’s my take…

      Because for the most part, their true belief is in their own superiority and a hatred of the outside society which isn’t paying enough attention to them anymore. They’re the busybodies who can’t force people to do things their way now. Any other trappings of faith that may have started them going aren’t the point, the point is that they’re the Defenders of the Faith and people aren’t following them like they should!

      Of course, the moment that ‘their kind’ are in charge again, they’ll fall in on each other as to which particular Faith is to be followed, but until then they all share a hatred of those people who dare to be happy and better off without them.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I would like to point out that falling on each other is not an activity exclusive to “their kind”.

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      2. @Hyman Rosen:
        Fair enough, falling in on each other happens with any sort of group focused on ‘purity’ or ‘the proper way of doing things’, regardless of other politics.

        There just currently happen to be a lot of otherwise very strange bedfellows, primarily on the conservative side, who would otherwise be strangling each other in their sleep if they weren’t all convinced they needed to defeat a common enemy first.

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      3. Yeah, Jenorah, I think patriarchy + anti-Blackness are powerful drivers of mood affiliation here, and then the Rationalizing Brain does the work of sparkling the doctrinal fissures. I don’t understand right-wing Orthodox Jewry well enough to have an opinion how they see the longer game of allying with obvious and ferocious anti-Semites playing out. It’s kinda not my lane. But the other three factions — White evangelicals, Catholic Integralists and eugenics-minded atheists — I know much better.

        The Integralists have the best-developed theory of POWER. The Vermeuille/Amari types figure they can convince all six conservative-Catholic SCOTUS justices and, oh, a thousand or so Fed. Soc. judges on the courts of appeals that the Constitution supports Falangism. But at bottom there aren’t that many Catholic Integralists outside the federal bench and the masthead of First Things magazine. And these are not people who accept the legitimacy of the Reformation. White evangelicals have the numbers, and David Barton’s Seven Mountains dominionism is also a theory of power. There are probably enough of them to support a fascist state. They’ve also got a shit-ton of money behind them. But there’s also a deep anti-Catholic strain, still. Dominionism and Integralism can cooperate pretty well on racial, sexual and gender/identity politics and right-wing economics. But how will they handle the doctrinal disputes they actually take seriously? So far, I’d argue the influence has been largely one-way: American conservative Catholics have been deeply influenced by White evangelicals, with not much going the reverse direction.

        Ironically the social-Darwinist atheist faction seems to have the least intellectual depth. And their numbers are probably not much larger than the Integralists. They are of course bad at science and philosophy. They have risible scientistic explanations for why Whites r00l Blacks dr00l, and women should be leashed and queers don’t deserve to live, all in service of their antagonisms. But they don’t seem to have a theory of a distinctly atheist reactionary state, or how to get one. Whenever they decide they’re not content to just be memelords and street-fighters in someone else’s white male revolution, they’ll be starting from way behind. (Same goes for the reactionary pagans.)

        Liked by 1 person

      4. @Jim Henley:

        Ironically the social-Darwinist atheist faction seems to have the least intellectual depth.

        Actually, that doesn’t entirely surprise me. (Spoken by someone who was around as Elevatorgate unfolded.)

        Mostly it doesn’t surprise me because a lot of the atheist faction in question seems to be pretty much atheist only to feed their own superiority complex (“Ha ha, those stupid believers in their sky fairy” sort of thing) and they didn’t actually arrive at atheism through any sort of rational process. The edge-lord ‘skeptics’ who like making fun of people who chase after Bigfoot but still believe in trickle-down economics. The Libertarian subset whose entire guiding principle seems to be ‘you’re not the boss of me!’

        Most of these aren’t people who ever had any intellectual depth, they just started with ‘smart people are atheists’ and ‘I’m smart!’ and went from there without ever questioning either of those two assumptions.

        Liked by 2 people

      5. Sounds about right, Jenora. As a quondam atheist myself, I know they’re not representative of all atheists, but I think you’ve identified the emotional motor driving the train that travels the skeptic-to-alt-right route.

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    1. I will tell my brother that the world ended on the day he turned 30. Don’t know how he will react to it.

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    2. There’s a Ramsey Campbell novella that I believe is on basically that theme: the world did end, but no one will admit it (although it hasn’t been published on this side of the pond and despite being a big fan, I’m a little reluctant to go looking for a copy when it has such hideous cover art).

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  7. And the Dark Lord Gossage-Vardebedian Spode has already chosen his new brand of Copium, declaring that clearly, the purge will begin tomorrow! Or possibly the day after that. Because fraud, military law, yada yada. Anyway, the coup is most definitely coming, folks! This is all exactly what was predicted, only it only has become obvious now! Just watch, folks! I mean–why are there still troops in DC, hmmmm?

    It’s astonishing, sometimes the amount of effort Beale puts into being wrong.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. I’m reminded of a line of Tyrion’s, admonishing his squire Pod to keep up with his wine consumption: “If it were easy to be drunk all the time, everybody would do it.”

      Liked by 3 people

    1. Interesting that you mention it, I have seen a copy of SJWs Always Lie in real life, the think exists,
      Was quite a shock.

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  8. It’s now over 48 hours since Biden took the oath – and Beale’s been blogging about libertarianism, Jews, Larry Correia, Patreon, Syria, and Apple products. What’s the new deadline? A week? March 4?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Fraser, your link provided Mr. LT and I with 10 minutes of solid laughs.

      I love that Legal Twitter is just calling this “the Gondor case”.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. This has been pointed out to me elsewhere on the web.
        The rest of the motion is batshit too, like arguing the plaintiff (Paul Davis, the lawyer who lost his job after participating in the Vanilla Isis assault) has standing because the current government will destroy the economy and punish him with cancel culture! He needs immediate relief!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I’m wondering if Davis filing such an insane suit is the equivalent of Nazi Chris Cantwell breaking down in tears — he’s discovered he’s not immune to consequences and he’s just lost it completely.

        Liked by 1 person

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