Straw Puppy’s POTUS Polls: Impeach Again, Like We Did Last Summer

One thing that Donald Trump is good at is drawing all the attention towards himself. In a normal post-election year, the focus of politics would be on the incoming new President. This year the focus remains on Trump.

A second impeachment is under way:

“On Monday, lawmakers introduced an impeachment article charging Trump with “high crimes and misdemeanors by inciting violence against the government of the United States” and thus having violated his oath of office.The House will debate the charge on Wednesday. The Democratic congressman David Cicilline of Rhode Island, one of the Democrats leading the effort, tweeted that the party had sufficient votes to pass it and impeach Trump a second time – a first in American history. But for him to be removed would require conviction in the Senate.”

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/jan/11/trump-impeachment-house-democrats-charge-president-with-incitement-of-insurrection

The timing means that the Senate won’t be able to consider the issue until after Joe Biden is inaugurated, so the impeachment can’t get Trump out of the Whitehouse any quicker. However, it would be absurd for Congress not to act in the wake of the physical attack on the Capitol by the President’s supporters.

While the second impeachment can only have a symbolic impact on Trump, events have precipitated more direct impacts on him. Deutsche Bank have announced they will no longer do business with the Trump Organisation:

“Deutsche Bank has been Trump’s most important lender. The Trump Organization, fronted by his two older sons, owes the bank about $340m in outstanding loans. After a series of bankruptcies in the 1990s, it was the only bank willing to give Trump money.”

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2021/jan/12/deutsche-bank-severs-ties-with-donald-trump

Corporate donations to the Republican Party have also been impacted by the Capitol riot:

“Republicans who voted to block Joe Biden’s confirmation as president have been deserted by some of the biggest corporations in the US, as some leading rightwing politicians begin to face potential consequences for the Capitol riot on Wednesday. A slew of companies, including Citigroup, one of the biggest banks in the US, and the Marriott hotel chain, said they would halt donations to Republicans who voted against certifying the results of the presidential election.”

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/jan/12/us-companies-political-funding-republicans-capitol-riot

This is not corporations suddenly grasping that Donald Trump is a bad man or that the GOP is unethical but rather the more basic truth that civil strife is bad for business. Wall Street might like lower taxes but are less keen on civil war.

But, as they say, we are not out of the woods yet.

75 thoughts on “Straw Puppy’s POTUS Polls: Impeach Again, Like We Did Last Summer

  1. You’re quite wrong about how impeachment could only have a symbolic effect on Trump. It opens the door to him losing his presidential pension, his travelling expenses, and oh, yes, being barred from ever standing for an election again.

    There’s a reason Trump will not be the first federal official impeached after leaving office.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. It won’t stop him running though. I’m not sure how the government would deal with it, given Trump’s blown past so many “the president can’t” barricades already.
      Hell, he can’t legally run for a third term, but I no longer think he was trolling when he kept saying it.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. The Senate can ban Trump from holding future office as part of sentencing. IDK how it would affect pardons or past pardons.

        Like

      2. “Trump’s blown past so many “the president can’t” barricades already”

        I see this argument a lot, where “Trump did such-and-such illegitimate thing” is conflated with “Trump can do anything he wants”, and it’s a bit irritating.

        He’s been able to do various illegitimate things that he had a simple mechanism to accomplish. In some cases that’s because they were carried out by executive agencies that he has authority over. In others, as with his many self-dealing conflicts of interest, they were business activities that aren’t necessarily illegal in and of themselves and in any case don’t require anyone’s permission to accomplish; the problem has been inadequate enforcement of penalties after the fact.

        The ban on an impeached-and-removed person holding elective office in the future isn’t like that. Trump doesn’t have any way to put himself on the ballot; he can say “I’m a Republican candidate for President now”, but so can my cats (at least, I assume that’s what some of the sounds my cats make might mean). It’s meaningless to say “who’s going to stop him”, because he’s simply not in charge of that activity (determining which candidates are eligible, printing the ballots, and holding the election) in any way and— barring a truly epic level of corruption that would in itself amount to a coup d’état— there’s no reason for the people who are in charge of those things to give a crap what he says. Anyone can say they’re running, and if they’re ineligible, the answer to “how the government would deal with it” is simply that they wouldn’t have to deal with it at all, or if they’re feeling very generous, a pat on the head and a “that’s nice” would suffice.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. While you have a fair point about “Trump is invincible” thinking, I don’t think it’s out of the question. He can certainly run and I don’t know the Republicans would have kept him off the ballot. If the Supreme Court said no, he’s ignored Supreme Court decisions before. Simply doing stuff and not caring about the law is an effective mechanism for getting things done.
        I don’t know it would have worked, but I wouldn’t rule it out. It’s no crazier than Bush II locking people up and holding them indefinitely based on nothing but his claims they were dangerous, or John Yoo asserting W had a unilateral power to disregard any constitutional or legal provisions for the greater good.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. frasersherman: He can certainly run and I don’t know the Republicans would have kept him off the ballot.

        The thing is, the ballots are drawn up and printed/pixeled by County and State election officials, not by the Republican Party. No doubt some would be willing to go along with it — but we saw a lot of Republican election officials who were absolutely adamant about discharging their responsibilities legally and fairly (in Georgia: Kemp, Raffensberger, Sterling, and Pak), and I don’t think he could get on enough ballots to get anywhere near to winning enough electoral votes.

        And I think if some election officials did put him on their ballots, the relevant courts would put a stop to it immediately.

        So I think that legally barring him from running again would actually be effective. He could pretend that he was a legit candidate, and he could maybe pull a few votes, but not enough to do anything.

        Liked by 1 person

      5. “Democratic interference STOLE my first term from me, just like they stole the 2020 election! Now they’re stealing my right to run again! Are you enough of a patriot to donate to Stop The New Steal or will you stand by while A-OC and Pelosi murder your children and drink their adenochrone?”

        Liked by 2 people

      6. Exactly and as some GOP people will agree with that, it will work in the nomination process. Then if he ends up being the candidate again…the GOP has the same dilemma: swallow his lies and agree with him or blow up any chance of winning the election.

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      7. “Any donation you make will be matched 1000%!!!”

        They are actually sending out e-mails which make this ridiculous claim. They don’t say who will be matching the mark’s $5 donation — it will be 20 other marks who also donate $5.

        Liked by 2 people

      8. Trump wouldn’t run after an impeachment because he won’t have the money. The corporate world is already stopping contributions to members of Congress who voted against Biden’s confirmation; I don’t see them contributing to a future Trump campaign.

        Online payment processors can refuse to work with his campaign. Local communities can refuse to give permits to rallies. How many venue operators are going to sign a contract with Trump’s campaign after seeing how they trashed the Capitol? I am worried about a lot of things this morning, but Trump running again isn’t one of them.

        Liked by 1 person

      9. He’s also got a shit ton of debt, and it’s looking increasingly unlikely he’ll find a way to cover his financial ass once he’s out of office.
        I’m perversely impressed that he’s managed to render himself so completely toxic (even if his base of support remains loyal) when even a minimum effort would have turned things around.

        Liked by 2 people

      10. Yeah, but he also raised hundreds of millions of poorly controlled dollars off the whole Stop the Steal schtick. I don’t know the details on just HOW uncontrolled those dollars are, but I bet he’ll try his hardest to appropriate that dough!

        Liked by 1 person

      11. From what I read a large portion of the cash goes straight to Trump’s PAC which has very few restrictions on how it might be spent. And it’s Trump – if he used his supposedly charitable Foundation as a slush fund, I wouldn’t bet on him showing any more scruples when it comes to PAC funds.

        (Most of the rest of it goes to the RNC – very little to funding legal action. It’s almost as if Trump knew there was no fraud to prosecute)

        Liked by 1 person

  2. “The timing means that the Senate won’t be able to consider the issue until after Joe Biden is inaugurated…”

    Pretty sure the Senate can convene at any time. This is solely the result of Moscow Mitch deciding not to call them back until after the election. It’s the best move for him, because it means that Republicans won’t have to answer the question: Insurrection, good or bad?

    On the other hand, waiting until the new Congress means there might be a chance of actually impeaching the MF. And yes, the most important thing is making sure he can never run for office again, and minimizing the damage he can do as Government in Exile. Of course people will still listen to him, but he won’t have the power he once did.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. “On the other hand, waiting until the new Congress means there might be a chance of actually impeaching the MF.”

      This.

      Good side: Dem control means there can be an actual trial instead of that travesty from the first one, whether or not they can actually muster the votes for a conviction. Sunlight is the best disinfectant.

      Bad side: A trial would take time and attention away from Biden’s legislative efforts and put a brake on the momentum of a recovery.

      The suggestions I’ve seen to wait until after the first 100 days sound good to me. OTOH, by that time I’m afraid outrage may already have softened, and Repubs will have had more time to tell themselves comforting lies, so I dunno.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Best comment on this topic by Jennifer Mendelsohn , whose brother observed “I love the fact that the entire moral fate of the country depends on finding just 17 honest Republicans. It’s like some impossible task from a fairytale.”

        Liked by 5 people

      2. @Orkydd: It’s cut from Kaguya-hime, in which she gives her suitors a series of impossible tasks, knowing that she can’t marry any of them and will be summoned back to the court of the moon in due course. Can’t ask them to find an honest Republican, let alone 17, as it’s far too obvious such a thing doesn’t exist.

        (yes yes temporally and geographically this makes no sense but it’s the first thing my brain went to. The second thing was a folk song called Captain Wedderburn’s Courtship, in which the woman he’s courting asks him a series of riddles.)

        Like

    2. The claim I’ve seen is that it requires unanimous consent to recall the Senate before the 19th, and Cruz or Hawley or whoever would refuse. The other claim that I’ve seen is this is not true.

      Like

      1. Richard Gadsden: It requires unanimous consent according to the rules, but a simple majority can change the rules.

        It wasn’t in their best interests to try to force a vote by the 19th. There are still too many craven Republicans in the Senate.

        At some point in the near future, not only will the Dems have control of the Senate, but a lot more facts about the attempted coup on the Capitol will have come out. It’s possible that the Senate will be forced to take some sort of action against Cruz and Hawley (especially since Trump declined to issue them preemptive pardons). It seems likely that evidence of members of Congress giving “reconnaissance” tours of the Capitol to insurrectionists is going to come out.

        17 Republicans with balls (or at least some semblance of conscience) are going to be required to pass impeachment, bar the Big Baby from ever running for office again, and take away his pension. The more evidence which comes out in the next couple of weeks, the more likely that is to happen.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. One other advantage of delaying is that it gave Trump a very strong reason not to pardon any of the insurrectionists. That would have considerably increased the chance of conviction.

        Like

      3. Delaying to after the inauguration also stops witnesses claiming executive privilege in order to avoid testifying?

        Like

  3. The Republicans in Capitol Hill when it was stormed: do they not realise they could have been hurt or even killed by the mob? Or is the denial (“It can’t happen to me”) that powerful?

    Liked by 3 people

    1. “But we’re the good ones, we’re safe!”

      Yes. Just like the PoC/gay/female Republicans, they have that much denial.

      Never mind that someone from one part of the country has no idea what the congresscritters from the other parts look like, nor that bullets don’t always go where they’re supposed to.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. That’s sort of why when the terrorists got to the chambers, they milled around unsure of what to do. They thought their allies in Congress and law enforcement would keep everybody there for them to capture. But the Congress critters went into the bunker and then were evacuated when the Guard arrived. And then they came back and finished the count ritual.

        By all accounts, a lot of Republican lawmakers are terrified of these people after what happened and so trying to avoid their wrath. But they’re already going after one of the Republican Reps who actually voted “no” on Trump’s impeachment, so it doesn’t matter how much appeasement they try. The insurrectionists aren’t actually loyal to Trump; they just think Trump will give them the violent punishment of opponents and control that he promised them. All the people who won’t accept them as good, powerful people will have to be silent. And they’re going to rage about it as long as there aren’t serious consequences for their rule of force attempts.

        But there is one serious consequence at the moment — 20,000 National Guard troops in D.C. and a lot of cops pissed that Capital cops were sold out by their own fraternity and beaten by the mob with one dying. There are serious civil wars raging, but they aren’t all entirely with us. It’s all of them trying to claim power on each other.

        Liked by 2 people

    2. That’s actually what I thought of when people were saying that Rep. Boebert shouldn’t have been writing “Pelosi has been moved out of here” on social media during the attack— saying that she was trying to tip them off to Pelosi’s whereabouts. Could be, but I can also imagine panic setting in as these people realize they’re not really in control of the nutjob mob they’ve set loose, and thinking “They hate Pelosi most of all, right? Just tell them Pelosi’s not in this room! She’s anywhere but here. No need to come in here.”

      Liked by 2 people

  4. The PGA yanking some tournament from one of Trump’s property has reportedly been the cruelest cut from his perspective, leaving him utterly ballistic.
    Despite the risk of him doing something else horrifying, I relish every bit of his pain.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. Well, he can’t nuke anybody, not even the PGA (and much as I dislike golf, no one deserves that), since the respective generals took away his ability to do so, and a court in Indiana has stopped his attempts to execute three people on Federal death row in his last few days of office.

      Liked by 2 people

  5. This is hilarious

    “big tech is essentially suspending the habeas corpus rights of 74 Million Americans” = “Without a text from their leader, millions of Americans have no idea what to do – no principles to lead them, no thoughts to inspire them. Give us back our commands to slavishly follow – we must have them to live”

    Liked by 4 people

  6. Meanwhile, the nutjob wing of the House GOP is making an uproar that the House now has Metal Detectors to prevent them from bringing weapons in (there was a fear that one of them might actually use them given how one of them tweeted out Pelosi’s location during the riot). You know, the same metal detectors that they have supported being placed in schools and stadiums – but Not for them!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hell, everybody else on the Hill has to go through metal detectors! Sometimes twice, as there’s an extra layer of security in the underground tunnels between the office buildings and the Capitol itself. I used to be a Congressional intern and I got pretty good at knowing how to get dressed so as to (1) quickly remove my wallet/keys and (2) not ping the metal detectors in some other way.

      Liked by 3 people

    2. Our state legislature, here in Arkansas, *compelled* our universities to allow concealed carry in the classroom and on the campus by students and teachers and anyone else who just wanders by.

      And yet they don’t allow guns in the state house, or in any of their OWN workplaces.

      Liked by 2 people

  7. Also, the SecState’s visit to EU/NATO has been called off, mostly because Luxembourg said so.

    Mighty Luxembourg!

    (which I know how big it is b/c one year on “The Amazing Race”, teams had to drive a moped the length of it and report that. There was more than enough time in the day for a few teams to do it over when they got it wrong, after taking the train in from Austria and then moving on to do more things in Switzerland.)

    Liked by 2 people

      1. It’s a bit like Delaware, one of Europe’s corporate havens and a perennial roadblock to EU wide tax reform and harmonization / coordination.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I knew about their financial/tax stuff. They’re probably smart enough not to have lent Agent Orange any money.

        I looked it up — the route laid out for the show (between 2 tourist attractions near the northern and southern borders) was 22 km.

        The moped slowed them down a bit as opposed to cars. But America is so big that everyone was amused at how tiny Lux is. Mr. LT used to drive twice that far to work every day (and then back). Basically it was a slight detour between Austria and Switzerland. It looked nice.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Luxembourg is nice. Though if you cross the border between Germany and Luxembourg in big and pricy car, expect to be pulled over, even there are theoretically no border checks. Because the people in the big and expensive cars tend to be the ones travelling to Luxembourg to park their money tax-free at the banks there.

        Like

    1. I think you are confusing Liechtenstein and Luxembourg? Because Liechtenstein sits at the border between Austria and Switzerland, while Luxembourg would be a detour of a few hundred kilometers to the north, between Germany, Belgium and France. I wasn’t going to say anything at first, because as far as i could tell by googling The Crazy Race was in Liechtenstein AND Luxembourg, but the 22km north to south fit better with Liechtenstein as well.

      It’s not very important, because, while Luxembourg is several orders of magnitude bigger than Liechtenstein, it is still very small and both are tax havens etc. One major difference though, is that Luxembourg is part of the EU, while Liechtenstein has a status similar to Switzerland, i think.

      Like

      1. It was some years back but I once read that Liechtenstein is the country where the cheap foreign labour is Swiss.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. If it’s between Austria and Switzerland, it’s Liechtenstein, which is even smaller than Luxembourg. Luxembourg is located between Germany, Belgium and France. You can easily get through both countries in an hour or two, though.

        In fact, Liechtenstein is so small, it’s basically blink and you’ll miss it.

        Like

      3. Maybe I am.

        But in either case, small nation that doesn’t have a giant military and survives as a tax haven told Agent Orange NO and made it stick.

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Also, Chuck Norris, a very staunch very right-wing guy, has condemned the Capitol insurrection.

    There are any number of jokes to be made here.

    Liked by 2 people

      1. Yes, after the photo of the lookalike started circulating, Chuck released a statement about how he didn’t support such goings-on. He was at home on his ranch in Texas.

        I mean, when you’ve lost Walker, Texas Ranger and Conan the Barbarian…

        Liked by 3 people

      1. camestrosfelapton: More than I expected and less than there should have been.

        Yeah, Colbert’s reaction was “And 10 Republicans also voted to impeach!”

        Whereas my reaction was, “211 Republicans, and only 10 of them have any sense of integrity.” 😐

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Apparently this is the most bipartisan ever impeachment (of a President). (Of a small sample of 4.)

        MSNBC reports that if it had been a secret ballot 50 to 60 Republicans would have voted to impeach. (Which is about the number that didn’t sign on to Trump’s attempt to steal the election.)

        Like

  9. It’s a pretty sad day when Liz Cheney is the conscience of the Republican Party in the House, in retaliation for which she’s going to be stripped of her posts and committee assignments. Because unity.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. IKR? The daughter of the guy who shot his friend in the face — and got the friend to apologize — the woman who stopped talking to her sister just to get more Republican cred (as if she needed it). And she’s the voice of reason here?

      Liked by 2 people

      1. And this has just reminded me of the 1996 film My Fellow Americans with James Garner and Jack Lemmon. I thought it was absolutely fricking hilarious at the time. I’m scared to look again for fear the Suck Fairy may have visited.

        Liked by 2 people

      1. If I understand correctly they don’t have to impeach them to a trial in the Senate – they can expel them directly.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Expulsion_from_the_United_States_Congress

        But there is also criminal indictment. While it is claimed that the President is immune from prosecution (untested in the courts) there is no such immunity for Congresspersons, the Speech or Debate Clause of the Constitution not withstanding.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speech_or_Debate_Clause

        Liked by 3 people

  10. Wonderful post, I thoroughly enjoyed reading it! I also recently posted an article on my blog about Trump’s second impeachment. I’m not from America so share a more external perspective, but would be really interested to hear your thoughts on my article if you have time! Wishing you all the best 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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