Looks like we’ve got incoming from Vox Day

So I looked at Vox Day’s public LinkedIn page yesterday and today Vox has a post complaining that I did (archive link). Which is weird. More weird is most of the post is devoted to Greg Hullender’s informative comment about Amazon’s approach to removing books from sale – with a link to Greg’s LinkedIn page! Apparently, Vox took that as a threat or an instruction guide or something — ignoring that he claims SJWs are already delisting his books so presumably would know how to do it already.

Anyway, just so you know: DO NOT GAZE UPON THE LINKEDIN OF VOX for it is not for mere mortal souls.

Advertisements

20 thoughts on “Looks like we’ve got incoming from Vox Day

  1. LinkedIn is weirdly stalkerish. The emails I get about who’s looked at my profile are quite disturbing, albeit it’s mostly just recruiters trawling for contacts. I keep on thinking I should delete my profile but the “just in case I need another job” aspect keeps me on there – which is their nefarious plan, of course.

    Like

      1. I have actually been creeped on via LinkedIn and it went a lot further than someone looking at my profile…

        Like

  2. I thought the point of LinkedIn was to get people to look at your page. Though I hate their stalkerish behaviour, too.

    Like

  3. Oh, poor, poor, Beale. Somebody he doesn’t like looked at his LinkedIn page! Quelle horreur! Oh, the humanity! My heart weeps for this tragedy!

    Or I’m laughing at his stupidity. One or the other.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. He certainly is a sensitive little snowflake, isn’t he? “Mommy!!! MOMMMMMMMEEEEEEEE!!! An SJW looked at my LinkedIn profile!!! He can’t do that, can he??? MAKE HIM STOP, MOMMY!!!” πŸ™„

    Liked by 2 people

  5. Aren’t people pretty much in control of how much others can see of their LinkedIn profiles? If he’s so sensitive about his absolute lack of experience or skill in any field he can always switch it to private, can’t he?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It turns out that if you can stand the heat, any publicity is good publicity. The unpleasantness in November 2017 doubled our readership (measured by monthly uniques) for a month, and we netted a permanent 20% increase from it. It continues to grow year-on-year as well. January 2019 was up 30% over January 2018, for example. We’re actually bigger than several of the magazines featured on this year’s the Locus Recommended Reading List now (though nowhere near the size of anything we review).

      So, other than being a really miserable experience, it doesn’t seem to have hurt us much. (Which doesn’t mean I’d want to do it again!) πŸ™‚

      Liked by 5 people

  6. When your business model is built around perpetual rage, you have to do something to keep it stoked!

    Like everybody else said, Linkedin is terrible. I still have an account–my profile is essentially bare–but I don’t even log in on those rare occasions when I want to see somebody’s profile.

    Having said that, complaining that someone has looked at your publicly available profile makes as much sense as complaining that someone has looked at your publicly available Wikipedia fork. That’s why you put it there, genius.

    Like

  7. Well, I see he inspired 28 people to look at my LinkedIn profile so far. I’m not sure why that should bother me; I’m proud of the work I did during my career.

    Vox does have a point of sorts: he wasn’t really trying to defraud Amazon’s customers; he was trying to use Amazon as a weapon to harass another author. Somehow I doubt he used that as an argument when he begged the company to reinstate his account though. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  8. And here, ladies and gentlemen, we see a perfect specimen of the superior race.
    read his comments and weep, for how uncivilised your genetics or lack of Christian belief makes you.
    *lol*

    Like

  9. On the voxian front:

    Am I reading that correctly? He wants people to PAY to help maintain his wikipedia knock-off with ten active editors?

    Like

    1. The more I think about it, the more it strikes me as so horrifyingly stupid, it’s brilliant. It’s not about the work or the product, but about the money. It capitalizes on the outrage marketing. There’ll be plenty of people who will be glad to pony up a monthly tithe in exchange for doing some pretense at minor edits once or twice a month.

      Liked by 1 person

Comments are closed.