But of Course @voxday is a 9/11 Truther

I hadn’t actually considered whether he was or not prior and yet, somehow, it was no surprise at all.

https://voxday.blogspot.com.au/2016/09/observation-is-not-conspiracy.html

Quite how that all fits in with everything else he espouses, I’ve no idea.

 

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15 comments

  1. thephantom182

    Troofers are having a renaissance lately. There was some nonsense over at Zero Hedge espousing the view that George Bush didn’t know about the planned 9/11 because he’d ordered Condi Rice not to tell him stuff, so that he could act all surprised later. Further nonsense about, and I quote, “nano-thermite” as the reason WTC 7 collapsed. Seriously, nano-thermite.

    My credulity stretches to the point that a small cadre of ninjas could mine the WTC and keep it quiet. Like, five guys maybe. Particularly if four of them conveniently died in the fire. That could happen.

    That the US government did it? And we still never heard about it, 15 years later? Nuh uh. Particularly given guys like Snowden. There’d have been a deathbed confession by now.

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  2. RD F

    yet, somehow, it was no surprise at all.

    I see Wright’s doubling down on his argumentum ad consequentiam nonsense again, and doing so based on his own blindness – “I don’t know how non-Christians find it in themselves to go on, therefore the Big Sky Fairy is real!”

    To which a good poet already gave a reply which Wright is incapable of grasping.

    At Moorditch
    by Richard Wilbur

    “Now,” said the voice of lock and window-bar,
    “You must confront things as they truly are.
    Open your eyes at last, and see
    The desolateness of reality.”

    “Things have,” I said, “a pallid, empty look,
    Like pictures in an unused coloring book.”

    “Now that the scales have fallen from your eyes,”
    Said the sad hallways, “you must recognize
    How childishly your former sight
    Salted the world with glory and delight.”

    “This cannot be the world,” I said. “Nor will it,
    ‘Till the heart’s crayon spangle and fulfill it.”

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    • thephantom182

      “I don’t know how non-Christians find it in themselves to go on, therefore the Big Sky Fairy is real!”

      You know, it -is- possible to not-believe in something without being That Way about it. Just saying.

      Mr. Wright for his part exhibits the unrestrained zeal of the Late Life Convert. He can be a bit extreme in his expressions of faith. Still, he does stop short of the stoning, burning alive and beheading that characterizes other zealous types we’re familiar with these days. Oh, and the knifing, the FGM, the honor killing of girls, the acid throwing, the indiscriminate bombing, the murder/death/kill, flying airplanes full of people into building full of people, and so forth. Maybe nukes soon. Could be.

      On balance, although he can be a bit much, I’m inclined to cut this Wright guy some slack. He saw something, and he’s trying hard to tell us what it is. He’s just not very good at it. Could be worse, right?

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      • David Brain

        “I don’t know how non-Christians find it in themselves to go on, therefore the Big Sky Fairy is real!”
        You know, it -is- possible to not-believe in something without being That Way about it. Just saying.

        And, indeed, it is possible to believe in something without being That Way about it too. 🙂 I think part of the problem may be that Wright imagines himself to be this century’s CS Lewis. Alas, all the evidence to date suggests that he doesn’t even understand Narnia, let alone Lewis’ serious theology. Heaven help us if he discovers GK Chesterton.

        (Interestingly, that poem describes my experience too. Just goes to show, I guess… But thank you to RD F for posting it.)

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      • thephantom182

        “I think part of the problem may be that Wright imagines himself to be this century’s CS Lewis.”

        I think he may not be entirely well, myself. A lot of the stuff comes across as desperation, flailing. He’s trying to get to something that he can’t articulate, despite his obvious skill with language. Reaching and falling short.

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      • camestrosfelapton

        Sometimes I dislike Wright less than Vox and at other times vice-versa. I think it is that Wright genuinely believes that a person should commit themselves to be being both a good and a rational person (as do I) and yet I find so much of what he says ends up very much not good and not rational. Vox on the other hand wants people to think he is clever and special – it is both more cynical and more honest.

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      • RD F

        Sometimes I dislike Wright less than Vox and at other times vice-versa. I think it is that Wright genuinely believes that a person should commit themselves to be being both a good and a rational person (as do I) and yet I find so much of what he says ends up very much not good and not rational.

        Wright’s version of “the good” is illustrative of his heart, and it’s not very pleasant. Men construct gods in their own image; pay attention to what a person says his Big Sky Fairy is like because he’s showing you his own ideals. In this case, they include petty hatred, an astonishing inability for self-reflection, and bigotry labelled as Divine Attributes.

        Vox is a sociopath; he’ll happily march you into the gas chamber if it suited his purpose. Wright, on the other hand, is worse – he’d burn you at the stake convinced he was doing what was right and necessary, and scream like a baby if you didn’t thank him while the flames were licking up around your feet.

        Fortunately both of them are essentially ineffectual.

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    • RDF

      David Brain : And, indeed, it is possible to believe in something without being That Way about it too.

      Wright has demonstrated quite adequately what he is and what he stands for – http://www.fstdt.com/Search.aspx?Fundie=wright

      We can extend the story he recently used to show exactly what’s wrong with his argument and his version of Christianity :

      Suppose we have only dreamed, or made up, all those things–trees and grass and sun and moon and stars and Aslan himself. Suppose we have. Then all I can say is that, in that case, the made-up things seem a good deal more important than the real ones. Suppose this black pit of a kingdom of yours is the only world. Well, it strikes me as a pretty poor one. And that’s a funny thing, when you come to think of it. We’re just babies making up a game, if you’re right. But four babies playing a game can make a play-world which licks your real world hollow. That’s why I’m going to stand by the play-world. I’m on Aslan’s side even if there isn’t any Aslan to lead it. I’m going to live as like a Narnian as I can even if there isn’t any Narnia.

      “… Lucy was struck with Puddleglum’s argument. “Why, you’re right! But – wait – an Aslan with a saddle on his back that you can ride is EVEN BETTER than your Aslan, because you can ride him like a horsey. So if we’re going to believe in made-up things because they’re better, we should believe in an Aslan with a saddle on his back that you can ride!”

      Eustace was dumbstruck at the brilliance of this idea. “And we can believe in an Aslan that hates the same people that we hate and justifies our hatred of them too. I really despise gingers because they’re perverted swine who pretend to be as good as normal people, even claiming that they can get married! Therefore Aslan should hate gingers as well.”

      Puddleglum was pleased at how the children had picked up his idea. “And even better than lions,” he mused, “are tigers. Tigers are cool.” He turned to the Lady of the Green Kirtle who was just standing there with her jaw slack in astonishment. “If you don’t mind, Lady, we refuse to believe in your world and we choose instead to put our faith in the much better world of our super-Aslan, a tiger with a saddle on his back you can ride who really really hates gingers.”

      And with that, the three of them set off into the world in fervent praise of their super-Aslan, stopping only to scream incoherently at a writer of children’s television who had a scene with two gingers kissing.

      “Fine with me,” muttered the Lady of the Green Kirtle, and left instructions that these yoyos were not to be allowed to reenter the borders of her realm.

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  3. Aaron

    Quite how that all fits in with everything else he espouses, I’ve no idea.

    Beale wants to be thought of as clever and important. Almost everything he says or does can be explained by this. Latching on to the 9/11 Truther movement lets him claim that he is smarter than all those people who believe the official account (which is what most people call “reality”) and assert that he knows the “real” story.

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  4. Mark

    The theory that the building in question was pre-rigged to blow as part of some secret “in case of fire, press demolition handle” plan is, umm, interesting….

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